Cells of Strength
Cells of Strength

18x24” acrylic painting

A muscle is composed of multiple bundles of cells called muscle fibers; these fibers generate the force to move our joints. Unlike other cells in the body, the muscle fibers have more than one nucleus, blue dots. Nerve fibers, in green, course around the muscle fibers, and include those that sense painful signals.

Neural Matrix
Neural Matrix

4x5’ Acrylic Painting

Neurons communicate with other neurons through their axons and dendrites. The dendrites extend from the round cell body and branch like trees to form a tangled web of connections with other neurons. This painting highlights two neurons, in red and turquoise. Additional neurons and dendrites in the background illustrate the depth of field of the neuromatrix and show the complicated web of dendrites that give rise to all that our brain does.

Signal Relay
Signal Relay

30x40” Acrylic Painting

Neurotransmission is the process of communication between neurons. Axons from one neuron connect to dendrites from other neurons to relay signals through a synapse. One side of the synapse contains the chemicals, called neurotransmitters, in round vesicles. Mitochondria, oval shaped, provide energy for the process. Actin, squiggly lines in dendrites, provides support and structure. On the right are axons with the myelin sheath, round circles, which speed the electrical signal.

Transmitting the Message
Transmitting the Message

18x24” Acrylic Painting

Neurons form complex networks for communication. Each neuron may have as many as 15,000 connections with other neurons. Electrical signals, action potentials, are transmitted along the axon to a synapse. When the electrical signal reaches a synapse it releases chemical signals called neurotransmitters. The neurotransmitter diffuses across the synapse and binds to receptors on another neuron to transmit the messsage.

Touch
Touch

12x36” Acrylic Painting

The epidermis, in pink, is separated from the dermis, in black, by the basement membrane in white. The epidermis is constantly making new cells from its basal layer, the dark pink column-like cells on top of the white basement membrane. Pain nerves, in green, course through the epidermis. Meissner’s corpuscles, dark green ovals in the dermis, are responsible for light touch. They are very sensitive and found in the highest concentrations in your fingers and lips.

EPSP&IPSP
EPSP&IPSP

18x24” Acyrlic Painting

Synapses receive input from both excitatory, in red, and inhibitory, in blue, neurons and add the signals up to determine whether they will send a signal to the next neuron. If there are more excitatory inputs the neuron fires an electrical signal. Chemicals, called neurotransmitters, are contained in vesicles at the synapse (shown as round colored circles)-presynaptic terminal. These chemicals diffuse across to the other neuron to bind receptors that then convert the chemical signal to an electrical current that travel along axons (round circles in black).

Purkinje Cells
Purkinje Cells

24x36” Acrylic Painting

The cerebellum, which is involved in coordination of movement, has a very organized structure that includes the large Purkinje cells (blue/green cells), granular cells (pink/purple cells), and basket cells (small green cells).

Purkinje cells (blue/green cells) receive more synaptic inputs than any other type of cell in the brain—with a single cell receiving more than 200,000 inputs. The granule cell (red/purple) on the other hand is one of the smallest and most numerous cells in the brain.

Life Vessel
Life Vessel

16x20” Acrylic Painting

This acrylic painting shows the inside of a blood vessel. Red blood cells carry hemoglobin throughout the body. White blood cells are immune cells that protect the body from infection.

Speed Demons
Speed Demons

20x24” Acrylic Painting

Neurons send electrical signals through their axons, in brown. The speed of the electrical signal is determined by the myelin sheath which is made from a glial cell called an oligodendrocytes (blue). The myelin is considered insulation and speeds the conduction of electrical signals down the axons.

Cancer
Cancer

16x20” Acrylic Painting

Cancer involves abnormal cell growth with the potential to invade or spread to other parts of the body. Cancer is a group of diseases with over 100 different types.

Treatment for many forms of cancer has improved exponentially over the last few decades, greatly decreasing the number of deaths caused by cancer. Because cancer is a group of diseases it is unlikely there will ever be a single “cure”.

Tendonitis
Tendonitis

16x20” Acrylic Painting.

This acrylic painting shows a tendon with inflammation. The tendon is made up of collagen (green/blue) that is normally organized in parallel. When injured the collagen can tear and when reformed lay down randomly. Immune cells, in pink, promote healing of the injured tissue. With exercise and use, the tendon structure reforms in parallel and the immune cells leave the tissue.

Shadow Self Portrait
Shadow Self Portrait

24x30” Acrylic painting

This painting shows a variety of immune cells that would be found in inflamed joints with Rheumatoid Arthritis. Rheumatoid Arthritis is a disease that is characterized by joint inflammation and is associated with pain and stiffness. If untreated people get significant joint damage and deformities. Thanks to great science over the last 20 years, this is rarely observed. Known as an autoimmune disease, rheumatoid arthritis is the result of an immune system attacking its own tissues.

Vision
Vision

16x20” Acrylic Painting

Rods and Cones are specialized neurons found in the retina that are responsible for vision. These photoreceptor cells convert light to electrical signals to send information to the occipital lobe in the brain so that we can see. Rods, in black and white, are the most numerous and are activated by low levels of light. Cones, depicted in colors, are responsible for color vision. The signals from the rods and cones are transmitted through bipolar cells, in yellow at the bottom of the picture, to the optic nerve. Pigmented epithelial cells, top of the image, provide structure and nourishment to the photoreceptors.

Growing Bone
Growing Bone

20x24” Acrylic painting

The growth plate, also known as the epiphyseal plate, is the area of growing bone in children, particularly in the long bones of the body-legs and arms. Each bone has two growth plates at each end. The top of the painting shows cartilage cells (blue) that continue to grow and produce new cells.

You Got Nerves
You Got Nerves

24x36” Acrylic Painting

This painting is a cross section of a nerve showing different sizes of nerve fibers. The largest ones are insulated by myelin, shown here as black rings. The largest nerve fibers, also called axons, send signals to our muscles to make them contract and move, and send signals from touch receptors so we can distinguish what we feel. The smallest, in red, orange and yellow, are thinly myelinated or unmyelinated and send pain signals to the spinal cord and brain. The unmyelinated axons congregate together in a Remak bundle.

Brain Fog
Brain Fog

18x24” Acrylic Painting

The clouded nature of the image represents the clinical symptom referred to as brain fog. Brain fog is described by patients with a number of conditions like chronic pain, after cancer treatment, and chronic fatigue syndrome. People with brain fog talk about difficulty concentrating and thinking.

Connected
Connected

24x36” Acrylic Painting

This painting shows loose connective tissue which surrounds all the tissue in the body. It is composed of collagen – yellow – and elastin – blue -which are produced by fibroblast cells – green.

Spinal Cord
Spinal Cord

24×36″ Acrylic Painting

The spinal cord is divided into the dorsal horn-upper part, and the ventral horn-lower half. The dorsal horn receives input from sensory fibers in green. It sends input through interneurons, in pink, to spinothalamic tract cells, in blue. These cells are important for transmitting pain and temperature signals to the brain for perception of pain. The background shows action potentials which transmit electrical signals between neurons.

Neuron Forest
Neuron Forest

8x10” acrylic painting

Neurons with their cells bodies as the base of the trees and dendrites forming the trunks. The paths between the trees represents where their axons travel. 

Cells of Strength
Neural Matrix
Signal Relay
Transmitting the Message
Touch
EPSP&IPSP
Purkinje Cells
Life Vessel
Speed Demons
Cancer
Tendonitis
Shadow Self Portrait
Vision
Growing Bone
You Got Nerves
Brain Fog
Connected
Spinal Cord
Neuron Forest
Cells of Strength

18x24” acrylic painting

A muscle is composed of multiple bundles of cells called muscle fibers; these fibers generate the force to move our joints. Unlike other cells in the body, the muscle fibers have more than one nucleus, blue dots. Nerve fibers, in green, course around the muscle fibers, and include those that sense painful signals.

Neural Matrix

4x5’ Acrylic Painting

Neurons communicate with other neurons through their axons and dendrites. The dendrites extend from the round cell body and branch like trees to form a tangled web of connections with other neurons. This painting highlights two neurons, in red and turquoise. Additional neurons and dendrites in the background illustrate the depth of field of the neuromatrix and show the complicated web of dendrites that give rise to all that our brain does.

Signal Relay

30x40” Acrylic Painting

Neurotransmission is the process of communication between neurons. Axons from one neuron connect to dendrites from other neurons to relay signals through a synapse. One side of the synapse contains the chemicals, called neurotransmitters, in round vesicles. Mitochondria, oval shaped, provide energy for the process. Actin, squiggly lines in dendrites, provides support and structure. On the right are axons with the myelin sheath, round circles, which speed the electrical signal.

Transmitting the Message

18x24” Acrylic Painting

Neurons form complex networks for communication. Each neuron may have as many as 15,000 connections with other neurons. Electrical signals, action potentials, are transmitted along the axon to a synapse. When the electrical signal reaches a synapse it releases chemical signals called neurotransmitters. The neurotransmitter diffuses across the synapse and binds to receptors on another neuron to transmit the messsage.

Touch

12x36” Acrylic Painting

The epidermis, in pink, is separated from the dermis, in black, by the basement membrane in white. The epidermis is constantly making new cells from its basal layer, the dark pink column-like cells on top of the white basement membrane. Pain nerves, in green, course through the epidermis. Meissner’s corpuscles, dark green ovals in the dermis, are responsible for light touch. They are very sensitive and found in the highest concentrations in your fingers and lips.

EPSP&IPSP

18x24” Acyrlic Painting

Synapses receive input from both excitatory, in red, and inhibitory, in blue, neurons and add the signals up to determine whether they will send a signal to the next neuron. If there are more excitatory inputs the neuron fires an electrical signal. Chemicals, called neurotransmitters, are contained in vesicles at the synapse (shown as round colored circles)-presynaptic terminal. These chemicals diffuse across to the other neuron to bind receptors that then convert the chemical signal to an electrical current that travel along axons (round circles in black).

Purkinje Cells

24x36” Acrylic Painting

The cerebellum, which is involved in coordination of movement, has a very organized structure that includes the large Purkinje cells (blue/green cells), granular cells (pink/purple cells), and basket cells (small green cells).

Purkinje cells (blue/green cells) receive more synaptic inputs than any other type of cell in the brain—with a single cell receiving more than 200,000 inputs. The granule cell (red/purple) on the other hand is one of the smallest and most numerous cells in the brain.

Life Vessel

16x20” Acrylic Painting

This acrylic painting shows the inside of a blood vessel. Red blood cells carry hemoglobin throughout the body. White blood cells are immune cells that protect the body from infection.

Speed Demons

20x24” Acrylic Painting

Neurons send electrical signals through their axons, in brown. The speed of the electrical signal is determined by the myelin sheath which is made from a glial cell called an oligodendrocytes (blue). The myelin is considered insulation and speeds the conduction of electrical signals down the axons.

Cancer

16x20” Acrylic Painting

Cancer involves abnormal cell growth with the potential to invade or spread to other parts of the body. Cancer is a group of diseases with over 100 different types.

Treatment for many forms of cancer has improved exponentially over the last few decades, greatly decreasing the number of deaths caused by cancer. Because cancer is a group of diseases it is unlikely there will ever be a single “cure”.

Tendonitis

16x20” Acrylic Painting.

This acrylic painting shows a tendon with inflammation. The tendon is made up of collagen (green/blue) that is normally organized in parallel. When injured the collagen can tear and when reformed lay down randomly. Immune cells, in pink, promote healing of the injured tissue. With exercise and use, the tendon structure reforms in parallel and the immune cells leave the tissue.

Shadow Self Portrait

24x30” Acrylic painting

This painting shows a variety of immune cells that would be found in inflamed joints with Rheumatoid Arthritis. Rheumatoid Arthritis is a disease that is characterized by joint inflammation and is associated with pain and stiffness. If untreated people get significant joint damage and deformities. Thanks to great science over the last 20 years, this is rarely observed. Known as an autoimmune disease, rheumatoid arthritis is the result of an immune system attacking its own tissues.

Vision

16x20” Acrylic Painting

Rods and Cones are specialized neurons found in the retina that are responsible for vision. These photoreceptor cells convert light to electrical signals to send information to the occipital lobe in the brain so that we can see. Rods, in black and white, are the most numerous and are activated by low levels of light. Cones, depicted in colors, are responsible for color vision. The signals from the rods and cones are transmitted through bipolar cells, in yellow at the bottom of the picture, to the optic nerve. Pigmented epithelial cells, top of the image, provide structure and nourishment to the photoreceptors.

Growing Bone

20x24” Acrylic painting

The growth plate, also known as the epiphyseal plate, is the area of growing bone in children, particularly in the long bones of the body-legs and arms. Each bone has two growth plates at each end. The top of the painting shows cartilage cells (blue) that continue to grow and produce new cells.

You Got Nerves

24x36” Acrylic Painting

This painting is a cross section of a nerve showing different sizes of nerve fibers. The largest ones are insulated by myelin, shown here as black rings. The largest nerve fibers, also called axons, send signals to our muscles to make them contract and move, and send signals from touch receptors so we can distinguish what we feel. The smallest, in red, orange and yellow, are thinly myelinated or unmyelinated and send pain signals to the spinal cord and brain. The unmyelinated axons congregate together in a Remak bundle.

Brain Fog

18x24” Acrylic Painting

The clouded nature of the image represents the clinical symptom referred to as brain fog. Brain fog is described by patients with a number of conditions like chronic pain, after cancer treatment, and chronic fatigue syndrome. People with brain fog talk about difficulty concentrating and thinking.

Connected

24x36” Acrylic Painting

This painting shows loose connective tissue which surrounds all the tissue in the body. It is composed of collagen – yellow – and elastin – blue -which are produced by fibroblast cells – green.

Spinal Cord

24×36″ Acrylic Painting

The spinal cord is divided into the dorsal horn-upper part, and the ventral horn-lower half. The dorsal horn receives input from sensory fibers in green. It sends input through interneurons, in pink, to spinothalamic tract cells, in blue. These cells are important for transmitting pain and temperature signals to the brain for perception of pain. The background shows action potentials which transmit electrical signals between neurons.

Neuron Forest

8x10” acrylic painting

Neurons with their cells bodies as the base of the trees and dendrites forming the trunks. The paths between the trees represents where their axons travel. 

show thumbnails